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Episode 60 — Seeing Identity for What It Is

Summary

Joe and Brett share perspectives and tools to see and feel through the limits of our identity on the intellectual, emotional, and physical levels. Explore how bringing awareness and transparency to our unconscious structures of identity can reduce rigidity and cultivate a healthier, more adaptive sense of self. "Having a fight with your identity is only more identity — it makes it stick harder. The object isn’t to get away from identity, kick it, or beat it into submission: it’s to love it and see what it is."

Show Notes

Our sense of identity is composed of the ideas and emotional states — even the gut reactions — that we identify as who we are. Identity is how we recognize ourselves. It guides the structure of our thoughts, emotions, and visceral responses.

Most people don’t spend their lives learning how to make their identities more transparent. We often think it’s hard to change aspects of ourselves. The reality is that transforming our identity isn’t inherently difficult — it’s just that a large part of it is allowing the unfelt emotional experience that our beliefs about ourselves hold in place. It’s hard to change identity from our head, and it’s hard to change aspects of identity that we aren’t even aware of.

If you’re running a business or team, it’s absolutely being influenced by your identity. Identity limits the emotions we’re willing to feel, the information we’re willing to receive, and the actions we’ll consider taking. These patterns propagate from leadership into a company.

In this episode, Joe and Brett share perspectives and tools to see and feel through the limits of identity on the intellectual, emotional, and physical levels. They explore how bringing awareness and transparency to our unconscious structures of identity can reduce rigidity and cultivate a healthy, adaptive sense of self. 

“Having a fight with your identity is only more identity — it makes it stick harder. The object isn’t to get away from identity, kick it, or beat it into submission: it’s to love it and see what it is.”

– Which aspects of your identity have recently been brought to your awareness? 
– What emotional or visceral experience came along with these insights?

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